Tag Archives: let

I’m a woman in computer science. Let me ladysplain the Google memo to you.

I’m a lecturer in computer science at Stanford. I’ve taught at least four different programming languages, including assembly. I’ve had a single-digit employee number in a startup. Yes, I’m a woman in tech. I have known, worked for, and taught countless men who could have written the now-infamous Google “manifesto” — or who are on some level persuaded by it. ... Read More »

Google Assistant can now share personal info in Allo, but only if you let it

One of the coolest features of Allo is the ability to bring Google Assistant into any conversation. Just type @google and you can ask Assistant questions like “What’s my schedule like today” or “Show me the latest Cars 3 trailer,” and it will happily oblige, saving you the trouble of opening Chrome or Calendar and searching yourself. Now Google is ... Read More »

Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare on Windows Store won’t let you play with Steam gamers

Continuing the trend of “Windows Store versions being demonstrably worse than their Steam counterparts,” Activision’s put out some disturbing news about Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare—namely, that the Windows Store version isn’t cross-play compatible with either the Steam version or the Xbox version. Wait, what? I thought the big draw for games in the Windows Store was making Xbox and ... Read More »

Leak suggests Meizu M1E will let you control your car remotely

Meizu’s upcoming M1E smartphone – which will likely carry the Blue Charm E moniker in the company’s home country of China – will allow users to control their car remotely, according to a new leak. The leak suggests that M1E users will be able to unlock their car doors, control air-conditioning, as well as heat up seats using the phone. ... Read More »

Flash video is ‘on life support,’ but big sites won’t let go

As a video format, Adobe Flash is almost gone for good. According to a report by Encoding.com, Flash accounted for just 6 percent of video output last year, down 15 percent from 2014. Today, it’s mainly used for legacy browsers, banner ads, and some specific edge cases. “We expect to see the Flash video codec disappear completely from our report ... Read More »