Apple Watch 2 Rumors: New Video Camera, Same Old Battery

It has only been a couple of months since we first learned about Apple Watch and a day since the wearable hit stores, but for Cupertino, the first edition is already a thing of the past.

Before Apple had even announced Apple Watch in March, we had decided that the second edition was worth waiting for. As it turns out, we didn’t have to be too patient.

Multiple sources claim that Apple is working on the next generation of Apple Watch, reports 9to5Mac. Apple Watch 2 will reportedly have a battery life similar to that of Apple Watch 1.0, and new features such as a video camera, as early as 2016.

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The idea that Apple Watch won’t get a battery upgrade might concern some, and the wearable’s lasting power got plenty of attention in the weeks leading up to its launch. However, Apple research has indicated that a major boost to battery life isn’t (yet) necessary.

Average consumers finish each day with a remaining charge of 30% to 40%, according to a 9to5Mac source. Given that customers seem satisfied with the current battery, Apple has decided to prioritize advanced Watch hardware in lieu of boosting battery life.

The video camera, designed to enable FaceTime via Apple Watch, would be built into the top bezel of the device. Users would be able to make, receive, or reject FaceTime calls on their wrists or reroute video calls to their iPhones.

This upgrade is fitting. At this year’s Worldwide Developers Conference, Apple demonstrated watchOS 2, which lets wearers answer FaceTime audio calls on their wrists. The video capability is an obvious followup, but one that could be pushed back to a later model.

(Image: Apple)

(Image: Apple)

In welcome news, Apple Watch 2 will reportedly have greater independence from the iPhone. Right now wearers can track activity and pay for goods without an iPhone handy, but they can’t text or send emails.

To improve solo Watch functionality, Apple plans to build a more dynamic chipset into the device — a project internally known as “tether-less.” This would enable basic communication without a connected iPhone; however, users would still need an iPhone for large data transfers such as software upgrades or media synchronization.

If these details have piqued your interest in Apple Watch, you may have more models to choose from. The company currently offers Sport, Steel, and Edition models but is reportedly broadening its portfolio to capture a customer segment that will pay between $1,000 (Steel) and $10,000 (Edition) for Apple Watch.

Apple did not indicate whether this means we’ll see a steel Watch with high-end bands, a less-expensive gold Watch, or a Watch of another material such as titanium or platinum.

Kelly is an associate editor for InformationWeek. She most recently reported on financial tech for Insurance & Technology, before which she was a staff writer for InformationWeek and InformationWeek Education. When she’s not catching up on the latest in tech, Kelly enjoys


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